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emergentfutures:

Extracting audio from visual information



Researchers at MIT, Microsoft, and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.
In other experiments, they extracted useful audio signals from videos of aluminum foil, the surface of a glass of water, and even the leaves of a potted plant. The researchers will present their findings in a paper at this year’s Siggraph, the premier computer graphics conference.
Paul Higgins: How do you spell privacy?

Full Story: MIT

emergentfutures:

Extracting audio from visual information

Researchers at MIT, Microsoft, and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

In other experiments, they extracted useful audio signals from videos of aluminum foil, the surface of a glass of water, and even the leaves of a potted plant. The researchers will present their findings in a paper at this year’s Siggraph, the premier computer graphics conference.

Paul Higgins: How do you spell privacy?

Full Story: MIT

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"Sebastian Bach, as a rule, does not indicate tempo at all, which in a purely musical sense is perhaps best. He may have said to himself: whoever does not understand my themes and figures, and does not feel their character and expression, will not be much the wiser for an Italian indication of tempo."

Richard Wagner
Über das Dirigieren (On Conducting)

(Source: leadingtone, via maestoso-allegro)

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sound-art-text:

Wanted to share an extract from this article by Andreas Engström and Åsa Stjerna - 
Sound Art or Klangkunst? A reading of the German and English literature on sound art
Has anyone else noticed the differences between how we speak about sound art in different countries in Europe? Would love to hear your thoughts.
Read article here.

sound-art-text:

Wanted to share an extract from this article by Andreas Engström and Åsa Stjerna 

Sound Art or Klangkunst? A reading of the German and English literature on sound art

Has anyone else noticed the differences between how we speak about sound art in different countries in Europe? Would love to hear your thoughts.

Read article here.

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sound-art-text:

I’ve been having a chat with @cjohnweaver on Twitter about the use of pianos in sound art (using this term very loosely here - I hate debating the term though, so I think that’s OK).
We started with talking about the piano as the symbol of all things bourgeois, as exemplified in Laurel and Hardy’s The Music Box. From there, we could see that this turns the piano into an obvious point of attack for artists whose work centres around democratising art.
Read our tweet chat here.
I’d like to take this opportunity to share my top five works, in which pianos are abused/destroyed. As you can guess, lots of Fluxus examples here.
Please contribute your favourite piano destruction moments!
No 1 - Al Hansen, Yoko Ono’s Piano Drop (1959)

The material value of an instrument or object is unimportant within Fluxus, as it is the experience of music and art that is valuable, not the artwork or instrument itself. Al Hansen famously pushed a piano off a five story bombed out building, during his time with the army of occupation in Frankfurt, Germany, which was then to be repeated as an Event in 1959 entitled Yoko Ono’s Piano Drop. The colossal sound of wood smashing to pieces on a hard concrete pavement with the last jolts of the strings, hammers, ivory keys and brass pedals, became a composition. In demolishing a traditional instrument Hansen demonstrates the Fluxus belief in ‘real’ sound. 
No 2 - La Monte Young, Piano Piece for David Tudor #1 (1960)

(see tweets for score)
Absurd scenarios and impossible predicaments often featured in Fluxus Events. The humour employed by Fluxus artists was of a playful nature, decidedly more light-hearted than the farces and dark satires of Dada or Futurist theatre. A shining example is La Monte Young’s Piano Piece for David Tudor #1, 1960, where the performer is invited to feed the piano with hay and water, and ends when the piano decides whether or not to eat .
No 3 - Annea Lockwood, Piano Burning (1968)

Part of the series, Piano Transplants, where each piano depend upon fire, water and earth for their transformations.
No 4 - Raphael Montañez Ortiz, Duncan Terrace Piano Destruction Concert (1966)

One of a number of ‘concerts’ performed by Raphael Montañez Ortiz, using domestic furniture in the Islington home of Jay and Fran Landesman, leading cultural figures in 1960s London. This rediscovered piano thought to be destroyed during the seminal Destruction In Art Symposium (DIAS) in 1966. It is one of the few significant sculptural survivors from DIAS, a pioneering season of events which included performances by Yoko Ono and John Latham.
No 5 - Gordon Monahan, Piano Airlift (1988/2006)

A Long Aeolian Piano is made by airlifting a piano by helicopter to the top of Gibbet’s Hill, overlooking the harbour of St. John’s. The piano serves as the soundboard for long piano strings suspended down the cliff of the hill. The strings resonate loudly from wind vibrations for duration of installation. In destroying this piano, a new instrument is born. 

sound-art-text:

I’ve been having a chat with @cjohnweaver on Twitter about the use of pianos in sound art (using this term very loosely here - I hate debating the term though, so I think that’s OK).

We started with talking about the piano as the symbol of all things bourgeois, as exemplified in Laurel and Hardy’s The Music Box. From there, we could see that this turns the piano into an obvious point of attack for artists whose work centres around democratising art.

Read our tweet chat here.

I’d like to take this opportunity to share my top five works, in which pianos are abused/destroyed. As you can guess, lots of Fluxus examples here.

Please contribute your favourite piano destruction moments!

No 1 - Al Hansen, Yoko Ono’s Piano Drop (1959)

The material value of an instrument or object is unimportant within Fluxus, as it is the experience of music and art that is valuable, not the artwork or instrument itself. Al Hansen famously pushed a piano off a five story bombed out building, during his time with the army of occupation in Frankfurt, Germany, which was then to be repeated as an Event in 1959 entitled Yoko Ono’s Piano Drop. The colossal sound of wood smashing to pieces on a hard concrete pavement with the last jolts of the strings, hammers, ivory keys and brass pedals, became a composition. In demolishing a traditional instrument Hansen demonstrates the Fluxus belief in ‘real’ sound. 

No 2 - La Monte Young, Piano Piece for David Tudor #1 (1960)

(see tweets for score)

Absurd scenarios and impossible predicaments often featured in Fluxus Events. The humour employed by Fluxus artists was of a playful nature, decidedly more light-hearted than the farces and dark satires of Dada or Futurist theatre. A shining example is La Monte Young’s Piano Piece for David Tudor #1, 1960, where the performer is invited to feed the piano with hay and water, and ends when the piano decides whether or not to eat .

No 3 - Annea Lockwood, Piano Burning (1968)

Part of the series, Piano Transplants, where each piano depend upon fire, water and earth for their transformations.

No 4 - Raphael Montañez OrtizDuncan Terrace Piano Destruction Concert (1966)

One of a number of ‘concerts’ performed by Raphael Montañez Ortiz, using domestic furniture in the Islington home of Jay and Fran Landesman, leading cultural figures in 1960s London. This rediscovered piano thought to be destroyed during the seminal Destruction In Art Symposium (DIAS) in 1966. It is one of the few significant sculptural survivors from DIAS, a pioneering season of events which included performances by Yoko Ono and John Latham.

No 5 - Gordon Monahan, Piano Airlift (1988/2006)

A Long Aeolian Piano is made by airlifting a piano by helicopter to the top of Gibbet’s Hill, overlooking the harbour of St. John’s. The piano serves as the soundboard for long piano strings suspended down the cliff of the hill. The strings resonate loudly from wind vibrations for duration of installation. In destroying this piano, a new instrument is born. 

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sound-art-text:

In the Ocean - A Film About The Classical Avant Garde

Bit of history for you… featuring Philip Glass, Frank Zappa, John Cage, Steve Reich and others.

(Source: theworldisconcrete)

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"The connection between thoughts and sounds is good only if there be a real connection between the thing signified and the symbol, and until then that symbol will never come into general use. Symbol is the manifestor of the thing signified, and if the thing signified has already existence, and if, by experience, we know that the symbol has expresssed that thing many times, then we are sure that there is the real relation between them."

— Raja Yoga (via masonictraveler)

(via mylittleillumination)

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"If you want to make someone feel emotion you have to make them let go. Listening to something is an act of surrender."

— Brian Eno (via echophlogs)

Read quotes with your mother’s voice.

(via notational)

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"No other people listen better than the indigenous, they can clearly listen miles away."

— Marlui Miranda

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"Whatever medium I’m using, the audience is going to be educated, adventurous, small. That’s because I’ve been shunted into the cultural corner marked “exemplary creative.” Once I might have been trying for the mainstream, at least in music. But the days of being played on the radio are long gone. Anything I do now has to be a demonstration of creative freedom, and be banished as a result to a kind of enriching, encouraging, educational ghetto. I don’t mean the work has to be, in itself, bland or harmless: it can be obscene, it can excoriate idiocy, it can scream for revolution. But because it’s in this ghetto that appeals to a tiny minority of grad students and gallery-goers and adventurous musical connoisseurs, it’s not going to make much of a difference to the world. It’s harmless in effect, if not intention. What that ghetto does, in fact, is legitimate the existing order by showing that things like variety and freedom of expression exist, and that even esoteric and experimental products can be marketed."

BOMB Magazine — Momus by Ross Simonini (via notational)

(via notational)

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doctorswetrust:

Beautiful diagrams in a 1986 Roland user’s manual.

(via notational)