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sound-art-text:

In the Ocean - A Film About The Classical Avant Garde

Bit of history for you… featuring Philip Glass, Frank Zappa, John Cage, Steve Reich and others.

(Source: theworldisconcrete)

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"The connection between thoughts and sounds is good only if there be a real connection between the thing signified and the symbol, and until then that symbol will never come into general use. Symbol is the manifestor of the thing signified, and if the thing signified has already existence, and if, by experience, we know that the symbol has expresssed that thing many times, then we are sure that there is the real relation between them."

— Raja Yoga (via masonictraveler)

(via mylittleillumination)

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"If you want to make someone feel emotion you have to make them let go. Listening to something is an act of surrender."

— Brian Eno (via echophlogs)

Read quotes with your mother’s voice.

(via notational)

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"No other people listen better than the indigenous, they can clearly listen miles away."

— Marlui Miranda

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"Whatever medium I’m using, the audience is going to be educated, adventurous, small. That’s because I’ve been shunted into the cultural corner marked “exemplary creative.” Once I might have been trying for the mainstream, at least in music. But the days of being played on the radio are long gone. Anything I do now has to be a demonstration of creative freedom, and be banished as a result to a kind of enriching, encouraging, educational ghetto. I don’t mean the work has to be, in itself, bland or harmless: it can be obscene, it can excoriate idiocy, it can scream for revolution. But because it’s in this ghetto that appeals to a tiny minority of grad students and gallery-goers and adventurous musical connoisseurs, it’s not going to make much of a difference to the world. It’s harmless in effect, if not intention. What that ghetto does, in fact, is legitimate the existing order by showing that things like variety and freedom of expression exist, and that even esoteric and experimental products can be marketed."

BOMB Magazine — Momus by Ross Simonini (via notational)

(via notational)

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Photoset

doctorswetrust:

Beautiful diagrams in a 1986 Roland user’s manual.

(via notational)

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"Anyone who has become entranced by the sound of water drops in the darkness of a ruin can attest to the extraordinary capacity of the ear to carve a volume into the void of darkness. The space traced by the ear becomes a cavity sculpted in the interior of the mind."

— Steven Holl, Questions Of Perception: Phenomenology Of Architecture (via house-thestillness)

(via house-thestillness)

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"Music can also be a sensual pleasure, like eating food or sex. But its highest vibration for me is that point of taking us to a real understanding of something in our nature which we can very rarely get at. It is a spiritual state of oneness."

Terry Riley (via nagging)

(via house-thestillness)

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notationnotes:

Microtonal Wall::Tristan Perich

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves across 25-feet.

notationnotes:

Microtonal Wall::Tristan Perich

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves across 25-feet.

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"Progressive music has completely failed to understand that, because it is so bloody self-conscious. It’s partly the fact of the technology we have; it constantly plays back music to us from the past. We hear it back on the radio, iTunes plays it to us; also you get them reinforcing medium through things like Pandora and Amazon: “If you like this, you’ll like that …” Spotify, which is always guiding you to new music and again it keeps you in your place. This is another aspect of static culture. It’s not so much about dead music but you play on Spotify a track you like, it will tell you – and quite accurately – other tracks you might like that are like that. So, again you’re kept in a static place constantly bombarded by a bit more of what you liked yesterday. That’s what I think."

New Statesman interview with Adam Curtis on the subject of ‘Static Culture’

[link]

(via prostheticknowledge)

(via prostheticknowledge)