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notationnotes:

Microtonal Wall::Tristan Perich

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves across 25-feet.

notationnotes:

Microtonal Wall::Tristan Perich

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves across 25-feet.

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"Progressive music has completely failed to understand that, because it is so bloody self-conscious. It’s partly the fact of the technology we have; it constantly plays back music to us from the past. We hear it back on the radio, iTunes plays it to us; also you get them reinforcing medium through things like Pandora and Amazon: “If you like this, you’ll like that …” Spotify, which is always guiding you to new music and again it keeps you in your place. This is another aspect of static culture. It’s not so much about dead music but you play on Spotify a track you like, it will tell you – and quite accurately – other tracks you might like that are like that. So, again you’re kept in a static place constantly bombarded by a bit more of what you liked yesterday. That’s what I think."

New Statesman interview with Adam Curtis on the subject of ‘Static Culture’

[link]

(via prostheticknowledge)

(via prostheticknowledge)

Quote
"Progressive music has completely failed to understand that, because it is so bloody self-conscious. It’s partly the fact of the technology we have; it constantly plays back music to us from the past. We hear it back on the radio, iTunes plays it to us; also you get them reinforcing medium through things like Pandora and Amazon: “If you like this, you’ll like that …” Spotify, which is always guiding you to new music and again it keeps you in your place. This is another aspect of static culture. It’s not so much about dead music but you play on Spotify a track you like, it will tell you – and quite accurately – other tracks you might like that are like that. So, again you’re kept in a static place constantly bombarded by a bit more of what you liked yesterday. That’s what I think."

New Statesman interview with Adam Curtis on the subject of ‘Static Culture’

[link]

(via prostheticknowledge)

(via prostheticknowledge)

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audiokayness:

Venetian blinds  … 

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yeaverily:

"The Concert in the Egg" by Hieronymus Bosch, 1475-1480

yeaverily:

"The Concert in the Egg" by Hieronymus Bosch, 1475-1480

(Source: reddit.com, via somecatsjustswinglikethat)

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MUSICAL NOTATION, AS DESCRIBED BY CATS

trumpetangst:

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(I would have liked to crop some of these gifs (like the accent ones) to make them more accurate but alas, I lack the skills.)

(via everythingsoundsmedia)

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televandalist:

For about a year I recorded every time I saw someone playing a record on TV. I recently unearthed the unfinished vhs tape. 

A documentary on the works of Christian Marclay. (:

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neuroticthought:

by Neuroskeptic

Why do some people hear music that’s not there?

Musical hallucinations are most commonly found in people who have suffered hearing loss or deafness. But why they happen is unknown. In a new paper in Cortex, British neuroscientists Kumar et al claim to have found A brain basis for musical hallucinations

Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), the authors investigate brain activity in a patient, a 66 year old woman who had been hearing phantom ‘piano melodies’ for almost two years, after she had suddenly become partly deaf. She was an amateur keyboard player, and was able to write down the tunes she ‘heard’:musicalhallucinationThe same melody – sometimes a real tune, sometimes ‘made up’ – would repeat for hours at a time, and it could get annoying. However, she had discovered that listening to certain pieces of real music provided temporary relief; the hallucinations would stop during the piece, and only restart after a certain lag-period of several seconds.

Kumar et al made use of this fact to compare brain activity when hallucinations were ‘on’ and ‘off’ – they recorded MEG data before and after playing 15 seconds of Bach, one of the hallucination-blocking composers. Immediately after each Bach burst, hallucinations were low, while 60 seconds later they had returned.

hallucinationsClever… however there’s a serious problem in this procedure: it can’t separate the effects of hallucinations from the effects of stopping listening to real music, nor from the expectation of future real music (the timing of which was predictable).

The obvious solution would have been to also include bursts of some music that didn’tblock hallucinations, as a control condition. The patient herself reported that some music didn’t. This would dramatically increase the inferences one could draw from the data. Some MEG data from healthy control participants hearing the same music would also help to establish specificity. This limitation isn’t acknowledged.

Anyway, Kumar et al report increased gamma band activity in the left aSTG area, part of the auditory cortex. They say that

The area that shows higher activity during musical hallucination coincides with an area implicated in the normal perception of melody using fMRI.

However, strangely, the actual Bach music did not produce significant changes in activity in this area, or anywhere else in the brain. Only  imaginary music caused real brain waves; Kumar et al say that this has been seen in other studies and

It is not yet understood why phantom percepts are associated with much stronger gamma oscillations, as measured with MEG and electroencephalography (EEG), than those associated with external sensory stimulation; for review see Sedley & Cunningham, 2013 “Do cortical gamma oscillations promote or suppress perception?”

Some other changes in the beta frequency band were found in the motor cortex and posteromedial cortex/precuneus. Neither of these is thought of as a ‘music area’. To be honest, I don’t think these results shed much light on the phenomenon.

The second half of the paper is rather different, providing a theoretical overview of musical hallucination. This section could almost be a paper in itself. The authors argue that

Our hypothesis is that peripheral hearing loss reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of incoming auditory stimuli and the brain responds by decreasing sensory precision or post-synaptic gain…

A recurrent loop of communication is thus established which is no longer informed, or entrained, by precise bottom-up sensory prediction errors… it is constrained only by a need to preserve the internal consistency between hierarchical representations of music.

This reciprocal communication between an area in music perception and area/s involved in higher music cognition (motor cortex and precuneus) with no constraint from the sensory input gives rise to musical hallucinations.

Kumar S, Sedley W, Barnes GR, Teki S, Friston KJ, & Griffiths TD (2013). A brain basis for musical hallucinations. Cortex PMID: 24445167

(via dharmadhatu)